The Abolitionism Movement: Who Freed The Slaves?

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The Abolitionism Movement was a major turning point in history, but who actually freed the slaves? The Abolitionists were people who believed slavery should be abolished, including all African Americans.

Introduction

The American Civil War was fought from 1861-1865, and during this time, over 600,000 slaves were freed. The abolition movement was a large part of why this happened. It began in the 1700s with groups like the Quakers and Methodists who believed that slavery was wrong. In 1776, the Declaration of Independence was signed and included a statement that all men are created equal. This statement led to the abolition movement in America.

In 1808, Congress passed the Missouri Compromise which allowed for slavery in Kansas but prohibited it in any future states. The North wanted to get rid of slavery while the South wanted it to stay because they saw it as a way of preserving their wealth. In 1849, Harriet Beecher Stowe published her book Uncle Tom’s Cabin which told the story of a white slave owner named Mr. Shelby who is confronted with the reality of slavery. This book led to many people being outraged at slavery and helped to start the abolition movement.

In 1860, Abraham Lincoln was elected president and he made ending slavery one of his top priorities. He called for troops to be sent to fight in the war if needed so that slavery could

The Abolitionism Movement

The Abolitionism Movement: Who Freed The Slaves?

Abolitionism Movement was a campaign to end slavery in the United States. The movement began in the 1760s, but it wasn’t until the mid-19th century that it gained momentum and finally succeeded in 1807 with the passage of the Fugitive Slave Act.

Although many people were involved in the movement, some of the most prominent advocates were abolitionists like William Lloyd Garrison and Frederick Douglass. They argued that slavery was wrong and immoral and that it should be abolished immediately.

Eventually, the Abolitionism Movement led to the end of slavery in America. Thanks to the efforts of these brave individuals, millions of slaves were freed and could finally live their lives without fear of being sold or beaten.

Slavery In America

The Abolitionism Movement: Who Freed The Slaves?

The Abolitionism Movement was a series of efforts by Americans to end slavery. It began in the late 18th century and culminated in the abolition of slavery in America on July 4, 1863. The movement was led by people such as William Lloyd Garrison, Frederick Douglass, and Harriet Tubman. They worked tirelessly to educate the public about the evils of slavery and to bring about change. Ultimately, their efforts succeeded and slavery was abolished in America.

Effects of the Abolitionism Movement

The abolitionist movement freed the slaves, and it had a huge impact on how society is today. The movement started in the 18th century, and it grew in popularity until it finally succeeded in emancipating all slaves in the United States in 1865. The causes of the abolitionism movement are complex, but its main goals were to end the slave trade and to protect the rights of black Americans.

The abolitionism movement was not just a social issue; it had a great impact on economics as well. Prior to the abolition of slavery, slave plantations were major contributors to the economy of many southern states. After emancipation, these plantations became largely useless due to the lack of a workforce, and this led to a significant decline in economic activity in those regions. This has had far-reaching effects on society as a whole, as it has created large gaps between rich and poor countries, and it has contributed to widespread unemployment.

Conclusion

It’s often easy to forget that the abolitionist movement wasn’t a single event. But rather a series of campaigns waged over several decades by many different people. While there are some notable names such as Frederick Douglass and William Lloyd Garrison. Who played leading roles in the fight against slavery. It is ultimately the unsung heroes—the ordinary people who risked everything to make a difference. Who deserves our greatest admiration? Thank you for taking the time to read this article and I hope you have learned something new about one of history’s most important movements.

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