Good Catch: 7 Guilt-Free Ways To Shop And Enjoy Fresh, Sustainable Seafood

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When it comes to making eco-friendly choices with sustainable seafood, veganism and vegetarianism are often the first things that come to mind. What’s “greener” and more guilt-free than entirely abstaining from animal products, right? However, there are other ways to lessen your environmental impact while enjoying your favorite dishes, especially if they involve the succulent fruits of the sea: seafood. 

Enter sustainable seafood, the most environmentally efficient source of protein on earth. 

It refers to fish and shellfish products that are both wild-caught and farmed (also called aquaculture) with minimal environmental and social impacts.

Sustainable seafood is manage under a system of enforced environmentally responsible practices. They are consider “sustainable” under the following metrics: 

  • They are source in a way that prevents overfishing
  • They rebuild depleted stocks
  • They don’t use fishing methods that have incidental impacts on the ocean wildlife and habitats
  • They avoid bycatch incidents to secure a healthy population of marine life
  • They identify and protect essential fish habitats
  • They catch fish in a way that minimizes interactions with protected species
  • They take into account the social and economic impact on the communities from which the seafood is sourced. 

Indeed, seafood tastes better if you know that it is sustainably sourced. How will you know whether or not the products you bought from your trusted seafood market are sustainable? Read on to find out. 

1. Identify the source

Where do you get your stocks of fresh seafood? What are the seafood companies or seafood shops you patronize? Where do the stocks of your trusted Sydney fish market come from? Are they using sustainable fishing methods?  

While it seems like an inconvenience, it’s critical that you ask questions about where your seafood comes from. 

You may chat with your local fishmonger to know more about where they get their supplies and how they source them. You may also run a quick search online to determine if your seller source their products sustainably. 

It doesn’t need to feel like an interrogation. In fact, getting to know where your food came from and whose hands made it all possible, encourages mindful eating. It deepens your connection with food and allows you to appreciate your meals more. 

2. Be label literate

Look for sustainability certifications whenever you’re shopping at your local seafood market. Labels like Marine Stewardship Council and Friend of the Sea, signify that the fish and shellfish you’re getting came from certified sustainable and well-managed fisheries. 

3. Check guides and resources to confirm its sustainability

Is the seafood you plan to buy for your holiday dinner sustainable? Now that you know where your fresh seafood came from and how it was sourced, it’s time to check them with the organizations committed to studying and promoting sustainable fisheries. 

You can use one of the guides listed below to know the best sustainable choices for your region:

  • Blueocean.org
  • Seafoodwatch.org (Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch)
  • Goodfish.org.au (Australia)
  • Ocean Wise
  • Audubon G.U.L.F. (specific to Gulf of Mexico region)
  • EDF Seafood Selector
  • WWF Seafood Guides

The guides often categorize seafood as “best choice”, “eat less”, “better choice/better alternative”, and “avoid/say no.” For example, goodfish.org lists Albacore Tuna as something to be avoid, as far as sustainability is concern. There have been concerns about stocks being overfish. The guide offers better alternatives to this type of fish such as Cobia, Spanish Mackerel, and Australian Salmon. 

Take note that these guides may vary depending on the country, state, region, and even cultural and social preferences. Check them out and figure out which one aligns best with your beliefs. 

4. Pick a restaurant that prioritizes sustainability

Going out for a meal? Some restaurants and food businesses have made sustainability part of their operations. They’ll advertise where their products are from if they partner with eco-friendly supply chains. They might also include some sustainability certifications if they have. 

In some cases, sustainable restaurants can be searched using seafood guides. For instance, goodfish.org.au (in Australia) has a directory of sustainable seafood restaurants and their descriptions. 

5. Patronize whatever’s in-season, abundant, and available

Quit insisting on imported and rare seafood just because your recipe requires it. Instead, patronize whatever’s in season – they’re more likely to be sustainable. Since they’re plentiful, they tend to be cheaper too. You’ll also get a better-quality product since in-season seafood is guaranteed fresh. 

6. Embrace a waste-free lifestyle

Looking for plant-based alternatives to seafood isn’t the only way to “go green”. You can make a difference by reducing wastage.

Shop wisely and buy only what’s necessary and enough. Finish your food until there’s nothing left but shells and fish skeletons. And oh, you can also use the bones and shells for making a flavorful broth instead of discarding them after filleting. 

7. Practice mindful eating

Practice mindful eating too. Cook it the best way possible, maximizing its taste and nutritional value. Chow down slowly, using all of your physical and emotional senses to enjoy your food. Mindful eating enhances your gratitude for food and the people who brought it from the sea to your plate, improving the overall eating experience. 

Author Bio: Mina Natividad is a passionate daytime writer for Manettas Seafood Market, an online and interactive seafood delivery service which provides customers a true, first-class fish market experience without leaving home. Since she’s a seafood lover herself, she’s got a lot to say about food, well-being, and lifestyle.

When it comes to making eco-friendly choices with food, veganism, and vegetarianism are often the first things that come to mind. What’s “greener” and more guilt-free than entirely abstaining from animal products, right? However, there are other ways to lessen your environmental impact while enjoying your favorite dishes, especially if they involve the succulent fruits of the sea: seafood. 

Enter sustainable seafood, the most environmentally efficient source of protein on earth. 

It refers to fish and shellfish products that are both wild-caught and farmed (also called aquaculture) with minimal environmental and social impacts.

Sustainable seafood is manage under a system of enforced environmentally responsible practices. They are considered “sustainable” under the following metrics: 

  • They are sourced in a way that prevents overfishing
  • They rebuild depleted stocks
  • They don’t use fishing methods that have incidental impacts on the ocean wildlife and habitats
  • They avoid bycatch incidents to secure a healthy population of marine life
  • They identify and protect essential fish habitats
  • They catch fish in a way that minimizes interactions with protected species
  • They consider the social and economic impact on the communities from which the seafood is source. 

Indeed, seafood tastes better if you know that it is sustainably source. How will you know whether or not the products you bought from your trusted seafood market are sustainable? Read on to find out. 

Identify the source where do you get your stocks of fresh seafood? What are the seafood companies or seafood shops you patronize? Where do the stocks of your trusted Sydney fish market come from? Are they using sustainable fishing methods?  

While it seems inconvenient, you must ask questions about where your seafood comes from. 

You may chat with your local fishmonger to know more about where they get their supplies and how they source them. You may also run a quick search online to determine if your seller source their products sustainably. 

It doesn’t need to feel like an interrogation. In fact, knowing where your food came from and whose hands made it all possible encourages mindful eating. It deepens your connection with food and allows you to appreciate your meals more. 

  1. Be label literate

Look for sustainability certifications whenever you’re shopping at your local seafood market. Labels like Marine Stewardship Council and Friend of the Sea signify that the fish and shellfish you’re getting came from certified sustainable and well-managed fisheries. 

  1. Check guides and resources to confirm its sustainability.

Is the seafood you plan to buy for your holiday dinner sustainable? Now that you know where your fresh seafood came from and how it was source, it’s time to check them with the organizations commit to studying and promoting sustainablefisheries. 

You can use one of the guides listed below 

The guides often categorize seafood as “best choice,” “eat less,” “better choice/better alternative,” and “avoid/say no.” For example, goodfish.org lists Albacore Tuna as something to be avoid as far as sustainability is concern. There have been concerns about stocks being overfish. The guide offers better alternatives to this type of fish, such as Cobia, Spanish Mackerel, and Australian Salmon. 

These guides may vary depending on the country, state, region, and cultural and social preferences. Check them out and figure out which one aligns best with your beliefs. 

  1. Pick a restaurant that prioritizes sustainability.

Going out for a meal? Some restaurants and food businesses have made sustainability part of their operations. They’ll advertise where their products are from if they partner with eco-friendly supply chains. They might also include some sustainability certifications if they have one. 

In some cases, sustainable restaurants can be search using seafood guides. For instance, goodfish.org.au (in Australia) has a directory of sustainable seafood restaurants and their descriptions. 

  1. Patronize whatever’s in-season, abundant, and available.

Quit insisting on imported and rare seafood just because your recipe requires it. Instead, patronize whatever’s in season – they’re more likely to be sustainable. Since they’re plentiful, they tend to be cheaper too. You’ll also get a better-quality product since in-season seafood is guarante fresh. 

  1. Embrace a waste-free lifestyle.

Looking for plant-based alternatives to seafood isn’t the only way to “go green.” You can make a difference by reducing wastage. 

Shop wisely and buy only what’s necessary and enough. Finish your food until there’s nothing left but shells and fish skeletons. And you can also use the bones and shells to make a flavorful broth instead of discarding them after filleting. 

  1. Practice mindful eating

Practice mindful eating too. Cook it the best way possible, maximizing its taste and nutritional value. Chow down slowly, using your physical and emotional senses to enjoy your food. Mindful eating enhances your gratitude for food and the people who brought it from the sea to your plate, improving the overall eating experience. 

This online and interactive seafood delivery service provides customers a true, first-class fish market experience without leaving home. Since she’s a seafood lover, she has a lot to say about food, well-being, and lifestyle.

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